Position Paper: EU 2030 Biodiversity Strategy

Photo: Samuel Unéus
When harvesting, one of the actions the Swedish forest owners take to preserve and promote biodiversity is to leave and also create dead wood.

The Swedish forest owners take pride in managing their forest holdings sustainably. Therefore: Put the forest owners at the core of the Strategy and work with them in further developing sustainable forest management.

There is a lack of overall holistic policy perspective in the EU 2030 Biodiversity Strategy. Questionable starting points in the Strategy risks leading to unnecessary, costly and counterproductive measures. Member State competence on forest related policy is clearly at the risk of being infringed and the European forest-based sector is not acknowledged for its sustainable forest management. Finally, science-based and well-established definitions are missing for parameters intended to contribute to objectives being met.

SFIF therefore encourages the European Parliament and Member States to:

  • Secure that EU policy emerging from the Strategy is not counter-productive but balanced versus other policy instruments, which are equally essential in reaching the European Green Deal objectives.
  • Define that forest production and protection objectives can be met simultaneously and are not in contradiction.
  • Emphasize the long-term perspective needed when working with forest biodiversity.
  • Secure Member State competence on EU policy directly or indirectly affecting forests and forestry.
  • Acknowledge and further emphasize the sustainable forest management carried out daily by European forest owners, and its great importance for sequestering carbon dioxide in well-managed forests and delivering products that store carbon and substitute other products based on fossil raw materials.
  • Put the forest owners at the core of the Strategy and work with them in further developing sustainable forest management.
  • Secure that protection targets encompass a wide range of conservation efforts and areas, including those managed according to good forest stewardship.
  • Acknowledge Member State lead on work related to conservation and protection of habitats and species, as there is no one-size-fits-all due to the variety of European forests.
  • Refer any work on definitions, concepts of importance for objectives to be met and guidelines to Member States.